Leap and the net will appear - John Burroughs 

“It’s a terrible thing, I think, in life to wait until you’re ready. I have this feeling now that actually no one is ever ready to do anything. There is almost no such thing as ready. There is only now. And you may as well do it now. Generally speaking, now is as good a time as any.”

Hugh Laurie (via quotestuff)

Feet first.

(via allisontype)

(via alisonsampson)

From life drawing today

Going to try these out, they’re pure pigment so could be tricky #fabercastell

Drawing and hanging out @artisanroast (at Artisan Roast)

Wee cuppa and some drawing at Port Bannatyne post office (at Port Bannatyne)

An Encounter with Euan Uglow

image

Then, one day in my last term, Euan strolled by and told me that I didn’t know what I was doing. Now usually this would have led to a fair bit of antagonism.
 
But on this day, like a good Zen master dealing with a stupid and recalcitrant student, Euan timed his approach perfectly, and cutting the crap, just asked me which color I thought was the most prominent when I looked at the posing model, and how light or dark I thought it was. Then, after I had mixed and applied that to the canvas, we moved to the next most prominent color, and its tone, and most importantly the relationship to the first color. And so on. Until I had filled the canvas, often with colors that seemed totally wrong but had been ascertained by their relationship to other colors.

Shaping the Light

We represent light with gradations of tone, guided by observation and knowledge of the way it interacts with form. It’s very easy to miss the quality of the light if you’re just copying values. Instead you need to shape the light. This means molding the amount of light for each form, building up more light in one place and tapering it off in another. It means making value configurations within the linear structure of the drawing by allocating differing intensities of light according to the topography of form.

- Figure Drawing by Anthony Ryder

Yeah. (emphatically) I never draw anything anymore. All done with paint. And boy, is it fun. It’s like making mistakes and correcting them, that’s what [Thomas] Eakins used to say. And that’s what I do; I just keep throwing the stuff on, scraping it off, refining it and refining it, and that’s how it Jgrows.

Over a period of time you start to see something really working.

In a way there is, except I used to do a lot of drawing in those days. And that whole business of being afraid to lose your drawing because you’ll never get it back? Once I got over that - that’s when I really started to have fun.

You can always get the drawing back.

- Joe Bowler interview

“The very act of drawing an object, however badly, swiftly takes the drawer from a wooly sense of what the object looks like to a precise awareness of its component parts and particularities.”
— Alain de Botton